2. A lesson exploring Juliet's soliloquy in Act 4, Scene 3. Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 5 14. Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 2 (The Balcony Scene) 11. Juliet goes on to use another simile on line 49, fearing the "shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth." PARIS. In Act 4, scene 3, Juliet will follow-through on the plan my students are already questioning. registered in England (Company No 02017289) with its registered office at 26 Red Lion English Language. First of all, this soliloquy deals with fear, of what will happen if she takes the potion and of what will happen if she doesn't. It encompasses all the major themes in the play and many ideas all come together for the first time in this passage. This resource is designed for UK teachers. O simple!" Romeo compares Juliet to the sun (Act II Scene II) "But, soft! Reply. answer"Fee simple"? From then, Romeo is taken into a long journey to overcome all the obstacles ... ... Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet ... Juliet that it would be best if she married Paris. Cite William Shakespeare uses many different techniques to show Juliet's fears. Summary and Analysis Act III: Scene 2 Summary. Romeo compares Juliet's eyes to the bright stars (Act II scene II) "Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven Having some business, do entreat her eye To twinkle in their spheres till they return. "Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air" (Act 1 Scene 4) Mercutio is talking about dreams, and compares vain fantasy to the air. Year Published: 1597 Language: English Country of Origin: United States of America Source: Shakespeare, W. Romeo and Juliet New York: Sully and Kleinteich Friar Lawrence enters, just a moment too late, and sees Romeo’s corpse lying beside not-dead Juliet. A lesson exploring Juliet's soliloquy in Act 4, Scene 3. WriteWork has over 100,000 sample papers", "I turned what i thought was a C+ paper into an A-". Compare the imagery of the sun rising in the Balcony Scene to the imagery of the sun rising in this scene. It also demonstrates the fact that alliteration isn't just a repeated letter but sound with the inclusion of "Phoebus." This is a short exercise for analyzing Juliet's soliloquy from Act 4, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet. Learn figurative language romeo juliet with free interactive flashcards. Romeo, whom which the story revovles around, experiences love at first sight on his first meeting with Juliet, the daughter of his rivalry family. (Romeo & Juliet, pg.101, III, v, l.219) This betrayal by the Nurse left Juliet alone. Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 2 (The Balcony Scene) 11. 1. aloof: at a distance. Lastly, it introduces or reintroduces other opposites, such as reality versus appearance, which was the major metaphor in Juliet's earlier speech. 3.Act V Scene I "I pay thy poverty, and not thy will," and, "There is thy gold, worse poison to men's souls, Doing This is an example of a pun. A Cistern for Foul Toads. In other words, a metaphor is a figure of speech in which two strikingly different concepts or things are compared to one another based on a single common characteristic. It is the east, and Juliet is the sun." After students read the soliloquy, they are responsible for answering eight questions that go into full detail of the understanding of what a soliloquy is and what is going on throughout it. 3. Conditions. The scene starts with Juliet telling the nurse and lady Capulet to leave her alone. As fate grows throughout the characters lives, it eventually takes ... ... Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet ... Tybalt and Mercutio, the Prince must penalize Romeo. Last class, they talked through every other option Juliet has besides the potion, because they are not convinced that Friar Lawrence's potion is the best course of action. Leave a … answermetaphor - it compares Juliet to … While Othello conducts business with Lodovico, he tells Desdemona to go to bed and send Emilia away for the night. Act 5, Scene 3 (Romeo’s Soliloquy aka STFU Romeo) Personification (Death, that hath…), Dramatic Irony (the whole thing), Metaphor (death’s pale flag, palace of dim night), Foreshadowing (everything about Juliet looking like she is alive), Rhetorical Question (Why art thou so fair? But she won’t leave Romeo. lexiepg, Junior High, 8th grade, A+, (Enter LADY CAPULET) LADY CAPULET What, are you busy, ho? Home; Writing Standards ... Home / Language Standards with Lesson Plans / Fun Ideas for Teaching Language / Literary Terms Quiz for Romeo and ... Simile Example in Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 3. "Romeo and Juliet" is a story of family life, friendship and true love. She prepares to take the potion, but is frightened. Metaphors: (Act I Scene III) "This precious book of love, this unbound lover, To beautify him, only lacks a cover" In this quote, Lady Capulet explains to Juliet that Paris would make a worth husband because he is a "precious book of love", and … Act 4, Scene 3 Juliet convinces the Nurse and Lady Capulet to leave her alone, then takes out the potion the Friar gave her. Choose from 500 different sets of figurative language romeo juliet flashcards on Quizlet. Romeo and Juliet Passage Analysis-Act IV, Scene 3, lines 14-57 In Act IV Scene 3 lines 14-57, Juliet mentions her fears of the potion’s effects and the circumstances that may come with it. SCENE. Juliet, who desires not to wed Paris, asks for Friar Laurence's assistance. This worksheet features Juliet’s soliloquy from Act 4, Scene 3, with an emphasis on her fears over following through on her plan to reunite with Romeo. 5 Examples of Figurative Language From Each Act. jim. It is envious (jealous). 3. "As is a winged messenger of heaven" - That is just one of many. what light through yonder window breaks? This action of his leads to the death of Juliet. Square Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. ACT IV SCENE III : Juliet's chamber. Language Key Terms Key Scenes ... Watch: Juliet's soliloquy Start exploring Act 2 Scene 2 with this video where Romeo and Juliet actors Mariah Gale and Sam Troughton discuss the problem of Romeo's family and Juliet's solution. WriteWork.com. Romeo and Juliet. Enter JULIET and Nurse Next, she fears that she should awaken before Romeo arrives. This website and its content is subject to our Terms and She wakes up, and Friar Lawrence attempts to convince her to flee the scene. If one had to summarize this speech in just a few words, one would say it was an inner monologue about fear, in which Juliet worries about all the possible problems that could befall her. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Scene 1 21. … Then, she becomes afraid that it's a poison, which the friar "subtly hath minister'd to have me dead" so that he should not be punished for marrying her to Romeo. So it is evident that Romeo and Juliet, is a ... ... Romeo and Juliet yet their death is the consequence of their powerful love. Retrieved 21:12, December 05, 2020, from https://www.writework.com/essay/close-analysis-juliet-s-speech-act-4-scene-3-shakespeare-s. WriteWork contributors. The Nursearrives and in her grief, misleads Juliet into thinking that Romeo has been killed.When the Nurse eventually reveals that it is Tybalt who is dead, Juliet's fears are only slightly relieved. WriteWork.com, 05 November, 2003. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Scene 3 By: Isha C. Biswas, Tanisha Nagpal, Nikhil Desai, and Sloan Sweeney A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF THE SCENE Juliet, after obtaining the potion from Friar Lawrence in Scene 1, and "agreeing" to marry Paris in Scene 2, is sitting in her room when the Nurse and "…as Phaethon would whip you to the west." But, gentle nurse, I pray thee, leave me to my self tonight, "A close analysis of Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, when the heroine is deciding whether or not to drink the vial given to her by Friar Lawrence." A simile is used in Act 4, Scene 3, Line 39 of "Romeo and Juliet," when Juliet is describing her fear of waking up in the burial vault and compares it to "the horrible conceit of death and night." Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Juliet’s chamber. Juliet waits impatiently for night to fall so that she can celebrate her wedding night with Romeo. Act 4. I hope to use their skepticism to my advantage. Text of ROMEO AND JULIET, Act 5, Scene 3, with notes, line numbers, and search function. Thirdly, it discusses love and death, the two major contrasting themes. 05 Dec. 2020. Romeo and Juliet: Act 4 Scene 4-5 By: Anisha Ahmed, Zainab Ali, and Rabiah Syed The Nurse Capulet Lady Capulet Paris -Static Character -In the beginning of the play and throughout, Lady Capulet doesnt play a large role as a character. Romeo: There is no world without Verona walls/ But purgatory, torture, hell itself; Hence „banished‟ This editable 8-question close reading and annotating resource helps students derive deeper meaning from William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet. Uncertain that it will work, she lays down a dagger by her side so that she can kill herself in the morning if need be. Please leave any feedback! London WC1R 4HQ. Act II Scene III Friar Laurence: The grey-ey'd morn smiles on the frowning night, Check'ring the Eastern clouds with streaks of light; And flecked darkness like a drunkard reels From forth day;s path and Titan's fiery wheels. (Act 1 Scene 4) Romeo is talking to Mercutio before the Capulets' party, and compares love to a thorn. Romeo and Juliet: Plot Summary, Act 4 Act 4, Scene 1 Act 4 opens with Friar Laurence and Paris discussing his upcoming marriage to Juliet. Essay by He is careful not to be any more specific in his criticism. Juliet sees Romeo dead, and tries to get some poison from his lips to hers. All acts & scenes are listed on the Romeo & Juliet original text page, or linked to from the bottom of this page.. ACT 4, SCENE 3. Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare - Analysis of Juliet's Soliloquy Act 4 Scene 3. She worries for a brief moment that it might be real poison, and then freaks herself out by imagining what it'll be like to awake surrounded by a bunch of dead bodies, including the fresh corpse of her cousin Tybalt. Romeo and Juliet Act 4, Scene 3 Summary & Analysis | LitCharts. She ... ... disruption. After his initial meeting with Juliet at the Capulet ball, Romeo spends hours yearning for her and eagerly waiting to reunite with her. Figurative language is language that evokes imagery in the mind of the reader. WriteWork contributors, "A close analysis of Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, when the heroine is deciding whether or not to drink the vial given to her by Friar Lawrence.," WriteWork.com, https://www.writework.com/essay/close-analysis-juliet-s-speech-act-4-scene-3-shakespeare-s (accessed December 05, 2020). A close analysis of Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, when the heroine is deciding whether or not to drink the vial given to her by Friar Lawrence. Synopsis of Act 4 Scene 3 This quiet bedroom scene is ‘the calm before the storm’. Capulet’s orchard. Summary and Analysis Act III: Scene 2 Summary. figurative language. and that she'll have to "be married then to-morrow morning" with Paris. Juliet’s chamber. (Spoken by Juliet in Act 3, Scene 2) This repetition is used to illustrate Juliet's desperate desire for Romeo to come to her. (Act 2 Scene 4) and "Dry up your tears and stick your rosemary on this fair corse" (Act 4 Scene 5) In the first quote, the nurse compares romeo to rosemary, a very sweet smelling flower. Romeo and Juliet - Act 4, Scene 3 (Juliet's Soliloquy), Romeo and Juliet: Act 1, Scene 5 - The Party Scene, KS2 / KS3 Drama - Elf - The Play Script (Christmas Play), AQA GCSE English COMPLETE 'Romeo and Juliet' Revision, Macbeth 5 Acts Complete Set Revision Tasks. Romeo and Juliet: Act 5, Scene 3 Enter PARIS and his PAGE [bearing flowers, perfumed water, and a torch]. Imagery is the use of vivid or figurative language that appeals to the five senses. A close analysis of Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, when the heroine is deciding whether or not to drink the vial given to her by Friar Lawrence. Romeo and Juliet Passage Analysis-Act IV, Scene 3, lines 14-57 In Act IV Scene 3 lines 14-57, Juliet mentions her fears of the potion’s effects and the circumstances that may come with it. Nov. 20, 2020. In Romeo and Juliet's Balcony Scene it is found in abundance. 2. Juliet waits impatiently for night to fall so that she can celebrate her wedding night with Romeo. [Enter JULIET and Nurse] JULIET: Ay, those attires are best: but, gentle nurse, I pray thee, leave me to myself to-night, For I have need of many orisons: To move the heavens to smile upon my state, Which, well thou know'st, … Mariah Gale and Sam Troughton explore the problem of Romeo’s name and Juliet’s solution. (Enter JULIET and Nurse) JULIET Ay, those attires are best: but, gentle nurse, I pray thee, leave me to my self to-night, For I have need of many orisons To move the heavens to smile upon my state, Which, well thou know'st, is cross, and full of sin. You are here: Home / Language Standards with Lesson Plans / Fun Ideas for Teaching Language / Literary Terms Quiz for Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 3 / Metaphor Example in Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 3 This soliloquy highlights Romeo’s abundant love and admiration for Juliet. The Friar expresses his disapproval of the wedding plans, telling Paris that he does not know Juliet well enough to marry her. ... Romeo is a Montague and Toni is part of the Jets. " This page contains the original text of Act 4, Scene 3 of Romeo & Juliet.Shakespeare’s original Romeo & Juliet text is extremely long, so we’ve split the text into one Act & Scene per page. RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). Start studying romeo and Juliet act 4 and 5 figurative language. (Spoken by Juliet in Act 3, Scene … 3. Initially she worries "What if it do not work at all?" ii. I think she will be rul’dIn all respects by me; nay more, I doubt it not.” Lord Capulet has just offered Juliet to be married to Paris not knowing that she is already married to Romeo, and she cannot be married to both.This is an example of irony and symbol. Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 3 12. 10. When Romeo enters the tomb, he sees Juliet in a corpse-like state and launches into a long, sad speech, kisses her, and drinks his poison. Act 4, Scene 3 (Juliet Soliloquy) Hyperbole + Metaphor (freezes up the heat of life), Rhetorical Question (What should she do here? She does show that she is loyal to her Irony: Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something that the characters do not. Secondly, it concerns time, specifically the recurring night and darkness motif. "Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air" (Act 1 Scene 4) Mercutio is talking about dreams, and compares vain fantasy to the air. We explore Shakespeare’s use of metaphor when having Lady Capulet describe Paris in Act 1 Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet. cats Reply. Juliet then reflects on the Friar's plan. Asked by Wiki User. ... AQA English Language Paper 1 ... What How Why - S2 Media Sentence Frames £ 3.00 (0) Krazikas Figurative Language Posters In Hamlet, puns are mainly used in order to characterize Hamlet as aloof and sarcastic. Please leave any feedback! All acts & scenes are listed on the Romeo & Juliet original text page, or linked to from the bottom of this page.. ACT 2, SCENE 2. 7-11) This soliloquy is delivered by Romeo during the balcony scene. Her parents and Paris also believe she is dead and are extremely distressed. Answer. One of these famous plays is Romeo and Juliet. Metaphors: (Act I Scene III) "This precious book of love, this unbound lover, To beautify him, only lacks a cover" In this quote, Lady Capulet explains to Juliet that Paris would make a worth husband because he is a "precious book of love", and that he is only missing a cover (Juliet would be the "cover"). By engaging in this exercise, students will determine the purpose of the passage and support their claim … "'Tis torture, and not mercy. Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 5 14. What is Juliet's three fears in her soliloquy in act 4 scene 3? Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 4 13. When she says "I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins, that almost freezes up the heat of life", she is saying that she has a bad feeling something unfortunate is going to happen that may result in death. Search Close Menu. Ay, those attires are best. By julz69 Oct 22, 2004 478 Words. personification – gives human qualities to the moon. Romeo goes to Juliet's tomb, kisses her, takes the poison, and dies. Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3, filled with much classic Shakesperean imagery, is a turning point in the play for Juliet in which she wrestles with the conflicts in her life and then ultimately comes to a decision. Scene 1; Scene 2; Scene 3; Scene 4; Scene 5; Act 5. This may be why she died, she wanted to be with Romeo and not Paris. Read Act 4, Scene 1 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, side-by-side with a translation into Modern English. Summary and Analysis Act IV: Scene 3 Summary. In Act 4, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, Juliet's nurse finds Juliet in her bed, appearing to be dead. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Scene 3 By: Isha C. Biswas, Tanisha Nagpal, Nikhil Desai, and Sloan Sweeney A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF THE SCENE Juliet, after obtaining the potion from Friar Lawrence in Scene 1, and "agreeing" to marry Paris in Scene 2, is sitting in her room when the Nurse and Please leave any feedback!

There are other times, however, when we lean toward the exaggerated and poetic side of life, times when we thirst for drama and artistic expression, like marriage proposals and the contemplation of the meaning of life. Juliet's chamber. ), Personification (foul mouth no...), Run on sentence (or,if I live, is...), Simile (shrieks like mandrakes), Repetition (and, and, and), Imagery (bashing in … Family and Duty. Isadora's love ... A close analysis of Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, when the heroine is deciding whether or not to drink the vial given to her by Friar Lawrence. 3. "It is the east, and Juliet is the sun" (2.2.3). (There is a full list of the Romeo and Juliet soliloquies at the end of this section.) Top Answer. Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3, filled with much classic Shakesperean imagery, is a turning point in the play for Juliet in which she wrestles with the conflicts in her life and then ultimately comes to a decision. In WriteWork.com. "Who is already sick and pale with grief that thou, her maid, art far more fair than she" (2.2.5-6). download word file, 5 pages3.8 In Juliet’s soliloquy in act 4 scene 3, Shakespeare shows Juliet’s courage, faithfulness to Romeo, and realism. A hidden, implicit or implied comparison between two seemingly unrelated things is called a metaphor. William Shakespeare. These examples of soliloquy in Romeo and Juliet convey the pathos and depth of Shakespeare’s characters, the beauty of his language, and the profound influence of his words on the English language. question(Act 3, scene She could have run away to be with Romeo, but once her father committed her to marrying Paris, there was nothing that she could do. Compare And Contrast Romeo And Juliet To West Side, Romeo & Juliet , Who's Responsible For Ther Deaths. Romeo & Juliet Act 3 Questions ... His soliloquy is an excellent example of multiple types of figurative language. Christopher Waugh on 1st March 2017 After reviewing the presentation and film clips in the presentation above, the class then devised a model paragraph for the second script excerpt: In this example, “chequering” and “streaks of light” appeal to sight. A lesson exploring Juliet's soliloquy in Act 4, Scene 3. After seeing Juliet standing by her window, Romeo is overwhelmed by his love for her and regards Juliet as being more beautiful than the ascending sun. (Act 1 Scene 4) Romeo is talking to Mercutio before the Capulets' party, and compares love to a thorn. He further claims that the moon is grief-stricken and envious because Juliet is infinit… 5/3/2015 07:37:55 am. Heaven is here, Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog And little mouse, every unworthy thing," (Act 3 Scene 3) Romeo is telling Friar Lawrence how his banishment from Verona is a terrible punishment and torture because he is not with Juliet. Here, she imagines... A close analysis of Juliet's speech in Act 4, Scene 3 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, when the heroine is deciding whether or not to drink the vial given to her by Friar Lawrence.. (2003, November 05). Once Othello gets upset, he really gets into using figurative language. Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 4 13. Gratitude in the workplace: How gratitude can improve your well-being and relationships Answer to "And flecked darkness like a drunkard reels" from Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 3. Unable to succeed, she takes his ... "Good news: you can turn to other's writing help. The Nursearrives and in her grief, misleads Juliet into thinking that Romeo has been killed.When the Nurse eventually reveals that it is Tybalt who is dead, Juliet's fears are only slightly relieved. 2 3 4. Within dramatic plays, metaphors are incorporated to facilitate readers or audience to gain a better and deeper understanding of a particular thing, idea or individual. metaphor – it compares Juliet to the sun "Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon" (2.2.4). Blog. 2. (Act 3, scene 4)Lord Capulet: “Sir Paris, I will make a desperate tenderOf my child’s love. Created: May 14, 2015| Updated: Sep 21, 2015. ... Mercutio's "Queen Mab Speech" uses figurative language to show the theme of dreamers vs. realists that is central to the play. The day before the wedding, Juliet ... ... downfall of Juliet, Tybalt, Mercutio, and Paris. This page contains the original text of Act 2, Scene 2 of Romeo & Juliet.Shakespeare’s original Romeo & Juliet text is extremely long, so we’ve split the text into one Act & Scene per page. Scene Summary. Scene 1; Scene 2; Scene 3; Go to Quick Study. November 2003, download word file, 5 pages … Romeo & Juliet: Act 4, Scene 3. A lesson exploring Juliet's soliloquy in Act 4, Scene 3. Romeo & Juliet - Figurative language in Act 2 Scene 2 question"It is the east, and Juliet is the sun" (2.2.3). Tes Global Ltd is " (Act 2 Scene 4) and "Dry up your tears and stick your rosemary on this fair corse" (Act 4 Scene 5) In the first quote, the nu rse compares romeo to rosemary, a very sweet sme lling flower. (Act 3 Scene 2) Juliet is describing Romeo's face to her Nurse. This short film is suitable for teaching English literature and drama at GCSE and National 4/5. 2. She even says, "God knows when we shall meet again" which shows that she isn't sure what terrible consequences there may be from drinking the potion. How simple! Friar Lawrence: The gray-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,/ Check‟ring the eastern clouds with streaks of light (Act 2, scene 3) Type(s) of figurative language: How So? Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Scene 5 20. (II. This play ... ... and creative way to portray William Shakespeare's original play, Romeo and Juliet ... ... and marriage was certainly an act of possession to her. From examining Romeo and Juliet, it is evident that the play shows how prejudice leads to escalating violence when the opening brawl started by the servants, the duel between Mercutio and Tybalt and Romeo and Paris. Juliet and her nurse make the final preparations for the wedding that is to take place the following morning.Lady Capulet offers her assistance, but Juliet asks to be left to her prayers and sends the Nurseand her mother away. However, the Prince agrees that Romeo was acting in self defense. ... AQA English Language Paper 1 ... What How Why - S2 Media Sentence Frames £ 3.00 (0) Krazikas Figurative Language Posters (Act 2, scene 2) Type(s) of figurative language: How So? Lady Capulet and the Nurse bid Juliet good night. Tybalt's death is also a consequence of ill determined fate. 5 votes. In her soliloquy in Act III, scene ii, Juliet uses metaphors to describe day and night, as she anxiously awaits Romeo's arrival in the night. This editable 8-question close reading and annotating resource helps students derive deeper meaning from William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet.This worksheet features Juliet’s soliloquy from Act 4, Scene 3, with an emphasis on her fears over following through on her plan to reunite with Romeo. Start studying Romeo & Juliet - Figurative language in Act 2 Scene 2. Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Figurative Language question(Act 3, scene 1, line 30) Mercutio: "The fee simple? 'I think it best you married with the county'. (Act 3 Scene 4) This quote, spoken by Lord Capulet, could symbolize Juliet's death. Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Scene 4 19. Romeo and Juliet " and " West Side Story ... ... Juliet's parents find out about Romeo, and how she knew about Romeo and Juliet 's marriage ... ... plays. Videos (2) Notebook; A ct 4, S cene 3 [Enter Juliet and Nurse] Juliet. Language and Wordplay. 10. Web. In Romeo and Juliet, when Romeo sees the light on in Juliet's room, he says, ''It is the east, and Juliet is the sun'' (II.ii.3). Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 3 12. Wiki User Answered . ELA Common Core Lesson Plans. A lesson exploring Juliet's soliloquy in Act 4, Scene 3. View US version .

juliet's soliloquy act 4 scene 3 figurative language

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